The Pathway To Asthma

*This post was done in partnership with The Orbex Study.

The Pathway to Asthma

Did you know the number of children with asthma is on the rise? In fact, if a parent has asthma, their child’s chances of developing asthma are significantly increased. Similarly, reoccurring breathing problems are often a precursor to asthma.

The cause of the rise in asthma cases is still unclear. Researchers believe a contributing factor is the increased level of cleanliness in our environments. While most people consider a germ-free environment to be a good thing, research shows some bacteria are actually good for us, and allow us to develop healthy immune systems.

While exposure to good bacteria can improve immune-system function, there must still be a method to the exposure (having your kids roll around in piles of dirt may not be the best way to go).

University of Arizona doctors are researching a new method to help prevent or delay the development of asthma in children. The method uses a deactivated bacterial extract to stimulate the immune system to prevent respiratory infections. The bacterial extract, called Broncho-Vaxom®, has been shown to be safe for children in Europe and across the world.

Now, University of Arizona doctors have launched a clinical study to learn if this extract, in the form of a powdered supplement, can help prevent wheezing illnesses in infants and interrupt or prevent the development of asthma later in life. The University of Arizona is looking for infants ages fives months to 16 months to participate in this clinical trial. Your child may be eligible if either parent or an older sibling has asthma.

To learn more, call (520)-214-6178.

For more information on asthma, please visit one of these websites listed:

http://www.aafa.org/page/programs-for-patients-and-caregivers.aspx

http://www.lung.org/lung-health-and-diseases/lung-disease-lookup/asthma/living-with-

asthma/managing-asthma/for-parents-of-children-with-asthma.html?referrer=https://

www.google.com/

http://acaai.org/asthma/who-has-asthma

https://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health-topics/asthma

http://www.phoenixchildrens.org/medical-specialties/allergy-immunology/common-conditions/90%2CP01664

The University of Arizona Institutional Review Board has reviewed and approved this study.

By | 2018-03-07T03:29:44+00:00 March 7th, 2018|0 Comments

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